Articles Comments

Yeshua in Context » Intertextuality in the Gospels

“My Son” as Midrash

It’s a famous example of what seems to be the unusual, perhaps questionable, use of the Jewish scriptures by the apostles. It occurs in a very noticeable location — the birth narrative of Yeshua in Matthew. Some parts of the Bible get very little traffic, but the birth narratives in Matthew and Luke are pretty much highways and not little goat trails. So people are bound to notice some odd things about Matthew’s “this happened in order to fulfill” sayings. One of the two weirdest (there is one that is even weirder) is Matthew 2:15. Is Matthew able to read and understand the Hebrew Bible? Is he guilty of a strange and arbitrary reading simply to justify his belief in Yeshua of Nazareth? Of course the author of Matthew knows what … Read entire article »

Filed under: Background to Gospels, Detailed Commentary, Formation of the Gospels, Gospel Genres, Hebrew Bible as Testimony, Ideal Israel Theme, Intertextuality in the Gospels, Literary Features

Magi’s Gifts, Video

Matthew sometimes shows the scriptures behind the story of Messiah’s birth and sometimes he expects us to see them in the hints he leaves in the story. What is the Jewish background to the gifts of the Magi in Matthew 2? Click “Read entire article…” to see the video. … Read entire article »

Filed under: Background to Gospels, Birth of Messiah, Detailed Commentary, Ideal Israel Theme, Intertextuality in the Gospels, Video

Bethlehem Star, Video

When the very Jewish gospel of Matthew tells us the story of Messiah’s birth, you can bet it will be filled with Jewish themes. In fact, there are little known Jewish themes in the Matthew 2 story of the magi from the east and the star that reveals the place of Messiah’s birth. What was the star of Bethlehem? What is the Jewish background of the star and the magi? … Read entire article »

Filed under: Background to Gospels, Birth of Messiah, Detailed Commentary, Intertextuality in the Gospels, Preachable Points, Video

The Mockery and Abuse at the Cross

The following comments on Mark 15:16-24 are derived from Yeshua in Context, chapter 15. I felt that in this shorter version, these comments highlight the artistry of Mark, his way of showing but not telling. Note especially in this comments how Mark uses the innocent sufferer theme of the Psalms without specifically citing the references. No doubt the Yeshua-community knew these references and associated them already with Yeshua’s death. Unlike the many statements leading up to the crucifixion, the story of how it happened itself is concerned less with theology than with presenting in stark reality the betrayal of a good man, the senseless mockery, the brutal misunderstanding of what his kingdom is all about. Meaning is between the lines, a midrashic retelling of the innocent sufferer theme in the Hebrew … Read entire article »

Filed under: Cross, Intertextuality in the Gospels, Passion Narratives, Spectacular Commentary